Your Questions
for the Characters from
A Maiden's Honor




Have you ever finished reading a book and wished you could talk to the characters?  Well, here's your opportunity to connect with the characters from A Maiden's Honor.  I promise they will answer interesting questions in a timely manner, with their answers posted below.  Warning, some of the questions and answers may contain spoilers. Have fun!  

PLEASE NOTE:  My characters will NOT answer inappropriate questions, so don't bother asking them.  Thanks!



 
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Your Questions & Their Answers



Rob asked Cora:
The way you responded to injustice and sacrificed yourself for others, made me wonder if there are any heroines from your time you look up to. Your selfless and psychological approach to difficult issues reminded me a lot of Helen Burns from the Jane Eyre novel. Setting an example on how to live regarding difficult moral issues and inspiring change in others while still having a layered personality of your own seems to have developed so carefully over the years I wonder if there’s anyone or anything you draw inspiration from (literature or other sources)?


Dear Rob,

I am sitting at Naa’il’s desk with only a small candle to light the parchment as I ponder the answer to your question. I thank you for giving me pause to reflect on the people who molded me into the person that I am today. I would have to say that my mother and father were the greatest influences during my youth. I carry the lessons I learned from them even to this day.

My mother was a devout Christian. My sisters and I spent many nights listening to her read the stories from the Bible. She and I loved the tales about simple people who relied on God to defeat powerful enemies. The lessons that Jesus taught his followers also continue to guide and inspire me.

My father had an equal part in forming me into the person that I am today. He came to America to find a better life than the one he had left behind in England. Papa worked for seven years as an indentured servant to pay off the debt to bring him to this land. During that time he felt the burden caused by England’s unreasonable taxes. When the opportunity came, he joined the call to arms to fight for the colonists’ right to govern themselves. Mama and Papa often talked about the sacrifices that they made during the war. Neither regretted fighting for this noble cause.

My parents also engrained in my sisters and me about the importance of protecting the weak - especially for those who cannot fight for themselves. Papa used to say that it is easy to support a cause when there is no personal risk involved. The real test of our character comes when we are called to make sacrifices to help another. Though I have given much to protect my cousin, I would like to think that Mama and Papa are proud of the person the I have become.

Thank you for your thought-provoking question. I hope that I answered it to your satisfaction. 

Your friend,

Cora

p.s. Who is Helen Burns? She sounds lovely. Is she a friend of yours?








Rob asked Naa'il:

After you met Cora, many notions you had of life seemed to change. Some appear to be influenced by Christian aspects. Would you ever consider the possibility that not one religion may hold all the answers? Or would you say these changes are due to Cora’s psychology rather than her faith, and that she is more important for you than religion itself?


Sir,

I am as devout as I have ever been. My allegiance to my faith has never changed, even after Cora came into my life. I can admit though that Cora has had a profound effect on my life. She has taught me the virtue of mercy. My people teach that mercy is weakness. Cora proved through her example that it is strength. I am a better person for learning that lesson. Although, I still believe that an eye for an eye is the best way to address treachery. That is all I will say on this matter.





Annie asked Sarah: Are you sorry that you left your island?

Sarah's reply: Sometimes. I miss my people, everday. Sometimes I wish I could talk to them. I not sorry I left Tikutoa. I met Cattin. I so happy with him. Cattin, I say right?

Hassan: Yes. I couldn't have said it better myself. (He answers with a tender smile.)

Sarah: Good







Sue asked Thomas Campbell:  Why did you decide to travel with the French ship?, DId you know about the war? Or had you and Sarah been on your Island  for too long?

Thomas Campbell's reply:
I had no choice but to travel on the French ship. You see, Tikutoa is situated among a cluster of islands in a remote part of the South Seas. Few Polynesians ventured to visit Tikutoa. Sarah and I also remained hidden from European ships visiting this part of the world, and the world outside our island ceased to exist. I would be lying if I said that I didn’t yearn to take Sarah back to Scotland after she was born. The longer we remained on Tikutoa, the more I was resigned to spend the rest of our lives there. That was not a melancholy thought. We had a good life on our island, and we were happy there.

Everything changed when the French ship dropped anchor in our lagoon. The villagers welcomed their French guests much the same way they welcomed my wife, Allie and me. However, the French sailors were rude and disrespectful towards the villagers. A few of them even took a few of the women by force. For some reason, they left my Sarah alone. I knew it was not because they did not lust after her. You see, Captain Rochelle was always watching Sarah. I could almost see a plan forming in his thought. Therefore, I didn’t trust him. My greatest fear was that I would wake up one day and discover that my Sarah and the ship were gone. There was no way that I would ever get my Sarah back. So, I had no choice but befriend Captain Rochelle. It wasn’t long before he approached me about taking Sarah and me away from Tikutoa. I love my daughter with my whole heart. She is my greatest treasure, my greatest joy. If she was going to be taken on the ship, I at least wanted to be with her.







Jenna asked Naa'il: Did you ever love Samina?

Naa'il's reply: What sort of question is that? Do I have to answer this question? Thsi is beneath me.

Josanna: Naa'il, don't be rude.

Naa'il: Of course I loved Samina; I love all my wives and concubines, in my own way.